The Ex-Soldiers: Butterfly Road by Jason Duke

In somewhat of a departure, today on the blog I’m pleased to present the first chapter of a serialized novel by Jason Duke, The Ex-Soldiers, that we are working on and will be rolling out here on the site in the months to come. Jason’s fiction has appeared in publications including Plots With Guns, Thuglit, Spinetingler Magazine, Crimefactory, Needle Magazine, and A Twist of Noir. Jason is not just any old author, however, he is also a U.S. Army and Iraqi war veteran, and his time in the service clearly shows through in The Ex-Soldiers. So, enjoy the first chapter, “Butterfly Road,” and be on the lookout for more to come.

Jason DukeThe Ex-Soldiers
Chapter One: Butterfly Road

The interstate west of Gila Bend, Arizona cut a wide swath through the vast Sonoran desert. There, the long road appeared to run on forever into the deep blue distance of the horizon under the thin sheet of gauze cloud in the azure sky. It was seven in the morning. Long-armed sprinklers were spraying what looked like alfalfa in the wide green fields each side of the interstate. Heat was already up, rippling on the air and turning much of the water into steam, rising, shimmering and, finally, scattering in the oven-heated wind.

The Sergeant gazed out on the wide blue heaven and baked landscape hell below. He wondered why Hensley had attempted to smuggle her across in the midsummer; the worst time. Desperation? If that was true, then his love for the girl had turned him into a desperate fool. Now Hensley was…well, the Sergeant was not sure exactly. He did not know what became of the ex-soldier. That was what he was here to find out.

He looked to the dashboard, rechecked the locator device. Then he saw them: the yellow butterflies in the busy road. Hundreds of ‘em. Bright yellow wings with intensely orange wingtips bounded by black markings, though from his vantage point behind the steering wheel of the Jeep, the butterflies looked all yellow. Hensley was the real sap when it came to animals and little creatures, like the butterflies of the Earth. Yet, killing a thing so beautiful hurt the Sergeant, too. He knew the world was getting uglier. It needed more beautiful things. In his heart, he was not cruel, was not a terrible man—although he’d done many cruel and terrible things. The Sergeant wished there were another road. But there wasn’t another road. Only this road. He had no choice. He needed to arrive at the coordinates in the desert; the exact coordinates Gun had given him. And before it got too dark.

Rechecked the locator device. The coordinates pointed far into the desert. He still had a ways to travel.

Big Money by Jack Getze

Here it is again, that special Austin Carr moment when I know I am about to speak words that will produce inevitable, disastrous repercussions.

Stockbroker Austin Carr can be forgiven for his somewhat bleak outlook. After all, the divorced father of two is barely on the comeback trail following a pretty rough series of events in the first entry in the series, Big Numbers.

Big Money, the second chance for readers to take Carr for a spin, finds Austin serving as a consultant/advisor at the investment firm he’s a part owner of, Shore Securities, while he waits for the suspension on his license to be lifted.

Trouble is, it may not matter whether or not he gets that license back, because Shore is being investigated by the feds for allegedly commingling funds, a problem his boss, Vic Bonacelli, leaves Austin to handle while Vic runs off to Tuscany. Of course, if that were the only problem Austin had to deal with he may still be okay.

Instead, he’s also saddled with keeping an eye on Vic’s daughter, who’s in the midst of a messy breakup, and Vic’s mother, the infamous Mama Bones, who’s been known to have a hand in some underhanded dealings involving bookmaking…and bingo fixing. (Don’t ask.)

This Thing of Ours by Jack Getze

Anyone who’s been around the crime fiction community for any length of time knows the name Jack Getze. In addition to serving as the Fiction Editor for Spinetingler Magazine, Jack is an accomplished author himself, his work having appeared in A Twist of Noir, Beat to a Pulp and The Big Adios, among others. Today I’m pleased to welcome Jack for a guest post in conjunction with his Austin Carr Mystery series (Big Numbers and Big Money having been reissued by Down and Out Books), wherein Jack proves that, once again, sometimes truth can be stranger than fiction, and that some authors have very deep wells from which to pull for inspiration.

He was short, dark and handsome, with thick black hair and tunneling eyes that could warm you with a twinkle or drive you away with quick, venomous anger. The ex-boxer’s temper and willingness to fight were legendary, but so was his generosity, and so was his love for Sam, the German Sheppard who went with him everywhere. In the car or on his leash, the tri-colored, one hundred pound dog named Sam was Domenic’s closest friend.

“We’d be loafing on the job, smoking,” one of his former workmen recalled. “We’d see and hear that huge dog of his in plenty of time to get back to work before Dom arrived. We fooled him every time, convinced him we were one of his hardest-working crews. Man, we loved Sam.”

That workman’s employer, Sam’s owner, the man with the legendary temper, was also my father-in-law. He owned a successful electrical contracting business, served in World War II and worked like a dog all his life. Everyone called him Dom except his mother-in-law, Angelina, who called him Don as a passive-aggressive insult. (You had to love Angelina). And were it not for Dom and his daughter, who single-handedly dragged me to Jersey, the crazy story that is Big Numbers would not have turned into a series.

Let’s face facts, stockbrokers are boring by themselves. Austin Carr needed trouble with the mob. And luckily for me, my father-in-law provided introductions. Not personally (Well, there was that time Dom and I met the handsome “Big Frank” Condi in a restaurant), but mostly through stories about Dom in the newspaper. Trust me, Dom was not the kind of man you slap on the shoulder and say, “So Dom, tell me about this limo ride. Were you scared?”

Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat Graphic Novel Kickstarter Campaign

Andrez BergenIt’s no secret that I love the hell out of anything and everything Andrez Bergen is involved with. In fact, his novel Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat (TSMG) is one of my all-time favorite reads.

With one foot planted firmly in a futuristic world where Seekers—people employed by the government to hunt down so-called Deviants for what is euphemistically called “hospitalization”—routinely undergo Matrix-like virtual reality “tests” to ensure they are still in the fold and capable of carrying out company orders, TSMG manages to simultaneously have its other foot rooted in an authentic, throwback, hardboiled detective vibe. And it is in that fuzzy blending of post-apocalyptic and old-school noir that TSMG carves out what is one of the most wonderfully unique books I’ve had the pleasure to read.

Needless to say, when Andrez told me he was doing a Kickstarter campaign to fund a graphic novel version of the story in collaboration with Fée Romney I was overjoyed. If you’ve had the pleasure of reading Andrez’s work (One Hundred Years of Vicissitude, Who is Killing the Great Capes of Heropa?), I hope you’ll get behind this campaign. As you know with these things, every little bit helps.

Writing Comics: A Newbie’s Perspective by Christopher Irvin

I originally met Chris Irvin when I steered some graphic novels I had on my hands but wasn’t interested in his way. So in that regard, I guess I’ve always known he was into comics. Most of my interaction with him, however, has revolved around his crime fiction, both his short stories and his recently released novella, Federales. But when it came time for Chris to do a guest post in support of Federales, we thought it’d be interesting if he explored a slightly different side of writing, one many authors never think about: how to write for comics. So without further ado, here’s Chris on comics. (But do go buy a copy of Federales!)

I’ve been a fan of comics since I was young, collecting shiny Fleer trading cards and staring wide-eyed at the explosion of comics in the early-90’s (yes, that young.) I drew a lot as well, though that petered off as I got older and began to see true talent in those around me.

Skip forward a couple of decades and I’m knee deep in prose, working on short stories and a novella. But I’ve still got that itch to work on a comic. I sign up for a class on graphic novels at Grubstreet in Boston, taught by Katherine Roy and Tim Stout, who inspire me to work on mini-comics (four, six, eight page stories) and I’m off to the races.

Taking a cue from Dark Horse Presents, who run eight page stories/chapters, I write an eight page comic entitled, EXPATRIATE, about an American criminal who flees to Rio de Janeiro in the shadow of the coming 2016 Summer Olympics. The pages sit for a while, Boston Comic Con is postponed from April to August due to the marathon bombing, and I stumble into Ricardo Lopez Ortiz, a fantastic artist out of Brooklyn. I’ve sworn off purchasing a commission prior to going in, but I dig his art so much I pull the trigger anyway and he sketches a killer head shot of Judge Dredd for me.

Fast forward again a few months and I’ve been able to somehow rope Ricardo into this crazy project, which has now bloomed into a five issue mini-series. Fingers crossed, with a little blood and sweat and a lot of luck, this might turn into something.

Federales by Christopher Irvin

The Internet is a strange and wonderful place. I originally met Chris Irvin when I found myself with some graphic novels on my hands I wasn’t interested in and asked around on Twitter to see who may want them. Chris took me up on the offer, and from there we did the Facebook friend thing and started getting to know each other better.

Despite working as an editor himself at Shotgun Honey, Chris is a smart enough guy to know it’s always wise to have someone else look at your own work, so he reached out to me to look at a few short stories he’d written. One thing lead to another, and at this point I’m proud to call Chris a regular editing client and someone I’ve worked with on numerous projects.

So, I was particularly happy when I learned one of those projects, a novella entitled Federales, had been picked up as the debut publication for the One Eye Press singles series. Federales officially drops tomorrow (ISBN: 978-0615916545), but here’s what people who’ve had a sneak peek have been saying about it:

“Christopher Irvin’s FEDERALES is an absolute gut-punch of a novella. The story of one man’s search for redemption and justice within a Mexican system that has long-forgotten the meaning of either will haunt you long after the last page is turned.” — Todd Robinson, author of The Hard Bounce

“FEDERALES is a sweaty, feverish sojourn into a fetid limb of the Mexican drug war, where sentiment, principles and fellow feeling have no place. Christopher Irvin’s read will carry you swiftly through to the fitting end.” — Sam Hawken, CWA Dagger Awards-nominated author of The Dead Women of Juárez

Where Would We Be Without Imagination? by Stephen Paul

I’m pleased to welcome Stephen Paul to the blog today. I had the pleasure of working with Stephen on his debut novel, The Perfect Game, a fast-paced supernatural thriller involving a little baseball, a little science, a little sleuthing, and a lot of fun. And while I enjoy working on every manuscript I get the opportunity to help an author bring to life, it’s a special treat when one involves matters which are actually new and enlightening for me in the process—and I definitely wasn’t up on things like Rupert Sheldrake’s theory of morphic resonance prior to working with Stephen on The Perfect Game! But, as Stephen discusses in his guest post, that’s part of the power of imagination in action.

Lately, evolution has been on my mind. The whole notion that every single one of our attributes stems from a necessary purpose fascinates me. But what about imagination—the cornerstone of the inventor, the necessary tool for the artist, and the life-blood of a writer? What survival element did imagination possess that allowed it to flourish into what it is today?

A quick Google search provides a host of answers. I’ll go with the one from Richard Dawkins because it seems pretty easy to grasp. Dawkins, the atheist-extraordinaire, opines that imagination started out as simulation processes helping our ancestors avoid physical trial and error and then exploded in leaps and bounds.

Although I get where he’s coming from, as imagining the pain one might experience from falling off a cliff would definitely do the trick in teaching our ancestors not to fall off cliffs, it’s the explosion by leaps and bounds part that puzzles me. What evolutionary purpose allowed creative imagination to flourish in a way that resulted in Salvador Dali’s paintings or Stephen King’s books? How did we go from using imagination to avoid falling off cliffs to creating paintings about melting clocks and stories about killer cars and dogs?

Country Hardball by Steve Weddle

Country Hardball by Steve WeddleWriting fiction isn’t easy. Lord knows it’s not. And while it may seem counterintuitive to some, it’s always been my contention that writing short stories is actually more difficult than writing a full-length novel—there’s less wiggle room, less time to hem and haw instead of getting right to the point. For my money, it takes a special kind of skill to really do short stories justice.

That Steve Weddle chose to present his debut full-length work, Country Hardball, as a novel-in-stories was truly ambitious. That he made it work is extremely gratifying, though not a surprise to anyone who’s followed Weddle’s writing over the years at places like the Do Some Damage blog and in collections such as Protectors, First Shift, Both Barrels, Off The Record, and D*cked.

The eighteen stories in Country Hardball all take place in a small town along the Louisiana/Arkansas line. Various characters appear throughout the collection, as bit players in some of the stories, taking center stage in others. The most common denominator is Roy Alison, a man whose life seemed destined to run off the rails almost from the jump.

After spending over ten years in and out of juvie, jail and halfway houses, Roy eventually makes his way back to his small hometown, ready to finally make something of his life. Only, the town was never much to begin with with, and the decade Roy’s been away has left the working-class community hit hard by the downturn in the economy. Still, like the other residents of the town, Roy is determined to make the best of things, and thus sets about putting one foot in front of the other the best he can.

Penance / Greed by Dan O’Shea

Chris HolmI came to read Dan O’Shea’s first two Detective Lynch novels in a roundabout, backward way, as did a lot of people who’ve been longtime fans of Dan’s work. You see, the second book in the series, Greed, was actually “published” first. As Dan explains more fully in his recent guest post, the book, originally called The Gravity of Mammon, was written and shared as a sort of online exercise on Dan’s part.

Then the whole voodoo process that is queries and submissions and publishers and contracts unfolded in its mysterious way and, voilà, the first Detective Lynch thriller was now a book called Penance and Mammon had become Greed. However it all came to pass, they are both kick-ass reads.

Penance is truly a marvel of plotting, in which O’Shea weaves together two parallel stories which take place over 40 years apart in Chicago. Our contemporary guide, Detective John Lynch, is second generation law enforcement, his father having been killed in the line of duty when Lynch was still young.

At the story’s outset, Lynch is drawn into the puzzling case of an elderly woman who was gunned down from long range by a sniper as she left church. Hardly the type of victim one would expect to find on the end of a world-caliber shot, it soon becomes apparent there is something much more complex at work. As it turns out, the sniper is a member of an off-the-books government black ops agency, and he’s gone a bit rogue.

Full Throttle by Sam Hawken

Out There Bad by Josh StallingsFor my money, Sam Hawken is one of the most underrated authors working in crime fiction today. His first novel, The Dead Women of Juárez, is a hard-hitting story which uses the real-life tragedy of female homicides in the Mexican city of Ciudad Juárez as its backdrop. It made my Top 10 Reads of 2012 and, more notably, was shortlisted by the Crime Writers’ Association for the John Creasy ‘New Blood’ Dagger.

Sam’s second novel, the equally stark Tequila Sunset, also set in Ciudad Juárez and its sister city, El Paso, Texas, was once again recognized by the Crime Writers’ Association, this time nominated for the Gold Dagger—aka best crime novel of the year! Despite the man’s obvious and undeniable skill, however, he remains criminally under the radar for most mainstream readers.

So when I had the opportunity to work with Sam—who has previously dropped by the blog for a guest post and whose self-published Juárez Dance I have reviewed—I jumped at the chance to edit his Camaro Espinoza omnibus, Full Throttle: The Collected Camaro.

Previously released as four separate novellas (Camaro Run, Crossfire, The Drum and Sisters in Arms), Full Throttle collects all the rollicking Camaro adventures to date in one edition. As always, it wouldn’t be appropriate for me to actually review something I’ve worked on, so here’s what a few authors and publishers have had to say about the Camaro Espinoza stories:

The Collector Series by Chris Holm

This article I wrote originally appeared in All Due Respect Issue #1: Featuring Chris F. Holm. The issue includes a brand-new short from Holm titled “A Dying Art,” and Holm also sat down with fellow author Steve Weddle (Country Hardball) to talk all things writing. Round it out with more fiction from Todd Robinson, Renee Asher Pickup, Paul D. Brazill, Travis Richardson, Mike Miner, and Walter Conley and this is a publication you need to pick up if you haven’t already.

Chris HolmThose who’ve read author Chris Holm’s accomplished work in the short story format are well-aware of how talented a writer the man is. He’s been an Anthony Award nominee, a Derringer Award finalist, and his short story collections, 8 Pounds and Dead Letters: Stories of Murder and Mayhem, were met with universal praise from readers. Yet, despite all that, I was still completely blown away by the tour de force that is The Collector Series, in which Holm takes a pinch of fantasy, a little supernatural, a dash of hardboiled crime fiction, and blends them into a pitch-perfect adventure in a way that is nothing short of authorial alchemy.

Things haven’t shaken out Sam Thornton’s way for quite some time. Driven by desperation and good intentions, Sam made a very bad decision many decades ago. And you know what they say about good intentions…yeah, the road to Hell. Thing is, Sam didn’t make it all the way down that road, but got detoured into Purgatory and shanghaied into eternal employment as a soul collector—if your time has come and the powers that be have marked you for damnation, it’s Sam’s job to remove your soul and send it on its way to hell.

In Dead Harvest, the first book in the series, Sam is assigned to collect Kate MacNeil’s soul. At first blush it seems like a no-brainer since the young woman was caught red-handed, literally, having just butchered her family. However, upon attempting to collect Kate’s soul Sam is met with an outpouring of purity so overwhelming he’s convinced she didn’t commit the crime, that she’s been improperly marked for damnation. However, one does not simply refuse to collect the assigned soul. It’s never happened in the history of, well, ever. Failure to collect Kate’s soul is sure to seriously piss off the denizens of Hell who’ve claimed it. On the other hand, improperly sending a pure soul to Hell for damnation could touch off a war with Heaven.

Is GREED good? Gee, I hope so… by Dan O’Shea

Very pleased to wrap-up 2013 on the blog by welcoming Dan O’Shea to celebrate the publication of his second novel, Greed, which is out today from Exhibit A Books (ISBN: 978-1909223158).

Dan O'SheaHow do you feel about re-runs?

See, Ms. White reviewed this book before – quite a while ago. At the time, the title was The Gravity of Mammon and it was an experiment. I wrote it live, on my blog, posting the chapters as I finished them – two or three a week at the start, then, as I got rolling, a chapter a day until it was done. Took a couple months all in. Just a draft at that point, but I was pretty happy with it.

Ms. White liked it enough to review it then, almost three years ago. Now, it’s out in print form, though with a new title – Greed. Well, a second new title. For a while it was the title was shortened to just Mammon, then it was changed to Greed. The path to publication has been a long, strange trip.

See, back when I did the blog experiment, my first novel, Penance (which was published in April, 2013) was still making the rounds. One of the big New York houses had almost bitten on Penance just before I started the blog novel experiment – but they had this one tiny problem. Silly me, I thought I’d just redraft Penance to address their concern, they’d buy it and I’d be on my way to fame and fortune. Of course, once I got started, I couldn’t stop and I overhauled the book probably more than I should have. The publisher passed on it, of course, but now I had two pretty different versions of the same book making the rounds. And, while Greed isn’t a sequel to Penance exactly, it is the second book in the series, so they do have to match up.

The Editor’s Touch by Steven Axelrod

Very pleased today to welcome Steven Axelrod to the blog to talk about the first book in his Nantucket detective series, Nantucket Sawbuck. Specifically, Steven has been kind enough to share an exchange that occurred between him and his editor regarding a scene they were at odds over, and how they came to an agreement. He’s also included the scene in question, so you can see for yourself how things turned out.

Steven AxelrodWe normally think of editors as people who trim and cut our work, fix our mistakes and help us “kill our darlings” as William Faulkner memorably put it. What you don’t realize until you’re involved with a gifted editor at a real publishing house, is how they can inspire you to write more and better. It doesn’t always happen in a direct linear way, with the editor saying “You should put more detail here” “Flesh this out.”, though of course that sort of editorial direction does happen.

More often, a vital change comes out of a conversation, that can even start out as an argument. You always feel at the same disadvantage with an editor, when a real published book and the possible start of a meaningful career is at stake. They have the power. They’re agreeing to put your book out into the world under their imprint. It’s their money and influence and reputation on offer. If they want you to change things, you’d be foolish to refuse. Sometimes it seems the only real option you have is the nuclear one: just packing up your scribbled pages and walking away. Of course you could bluff it. But that’s a dangerous game to play. You had better be prepared to follow through if you make a threat like that.

There are other alternatives, and I found one recently.

Remo Went Rogue

Remo Went Rogue by Mike McCrary

It has been my great pleasure to work with screenwriter turned crime fiction author Mike McCrary on a couple of projects. The first manuscript I edited for him, Remo Went Rogue, is a powerhouse story that revolves around an attorney who decides to steal from a couple of his clients, figuring he could get away with it if they “ended up” in jail. Yeah…that doesn’t exactly go as planned, much to Remo’s misfortune and the reader’s pleasure. I thought it was fantastic, and had a lot of fun working on it with him.

One More Body by Josh Stallings

Out There Bad by Josh StallingsMy love for all things Josh Stallings writes is no secret, as I have given glowing reviews to everything of his I’ve had the pleasure of reading. The first two Moses McGuire books—Beautiful, Naked & Dead and Out There Bad—knocked my socks off, as did his memoir, All the Wild Children.

I’ve also had the pleasure of hosting Josh here for a couple of amazing guest posts: “Penguins & Vomit” (how can you not want to read that?) and “Mayhem & Thuggery” (I dare you not to read that!).

It was with great pleasure and a tremendous sense of honor, therefore, that I stepped up to the plate to work with Josh as his editor on the most recent entry in the Moses McGuire saga, One More Body. Given my involvement with the book it wouldn’t be appropriate for me to give a review per se, but here is what some well-respected authors have had to say:

“Hardboiled, intense, action-packed, with its heart on its ragged and bloodstained sleeve – Moses is back in another breathlessly brilliant pulse-pounding novel full of great, gaudy characters.” — Paul D. Brazil (Guns Of Brixton)

“Josh Stallings writes like a man possessed. He’s a live wire, a raw nerve — the rare writer capable of finding beauty in pain and pain in beauty.” — Chris F. Holm (The Collector Series)