Banned Books Week: 10 Most Challenged Books of 2009

Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to ReadAccording to the Office for Intellectual Freedom, the following were the 10 most challenged books in 2009 as reported to them:

1. “TTYL; TTFN; L8R, G8R” (series), by Lauren Myracle. Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs

2. “And Tango Makes Three” by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson. Reasons: Homosexuality

3. “The Perks of Being A Wallflower,” by Stephen Chbosky. Reasons: Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit, Anti-Family, Offensive Language, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs, Suicide

4. “To Kill A Mockingbird,” by Harper Lee. Reasons: Racism, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

5. Twilight (series) by Stephenie Meyer. Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group

6. “Catcher in the Rye,” by J.D. Salinger. Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

7. “My Sister’s Keeper,” by Jodi Picoult. Reasons: Sexism, Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs, Suicide, Violence

8. “The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things,” by Carolyn Mackler. Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

9. “The Color Purple,” Alice Walker. Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

10. “The Chocolate War,” by Robert Cormier. Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

The American Library Association has also put together an interactive map drawn from cases documented (2007-2009) by ALA and the Kids’ Right to Read Project, a collaboration of the National Coalition Against Censorship and the American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression. The map details specifically where each challenge came from, what book(s) it was for, and the reason given for the challenge.



For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read, visit their official website.
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5 Comments

  • Elizabeth A. White

    September 28, 2010 - 1:09 pm

    Amazing, isn’t it, that after all these years some of the same titles keep showing up. 🙁

  • le0pard13

    September 27, 2010 - 9:16 pm

    I see To Kill a Mockingbird still manages to make such a list. Unbelievable. Thanks so much for posting this, Elizabeth.

  • Pop Culture Nerd

    September 27, 2010 - 4:02 pm

    Yes, I agree. If you’re going to protest something, know exactly what you’re protesting. Otherwise, you’re just a lemming.

  • Elizabeth A. White

    September 27, 2010 - 3:37 pm

    And it kills me that, more often than not, the people who try to get books banned haven’t even actually read them, they’re just going by rumor, hearsay, or jacket blurb.

    I obviously don’t think banning books is appropriate period but, damn, you should at least have to prove you’ve actually read the damn thing before you can even challenge it, you know?

  • Pop Culture Nerd

    September 27, 2010 - 3:33 pm

    These lists always make me speechless, sitting here with my mouth hanging open and nothing in my thought bubble.

    The only thing I can say is at least I live on the West Coast, which generated fewer complaints than the East Coast.