April Skies by Ian Ayris

Ian AyrisSomething’s movin towards me. Gettin closer. Feelin its way in the dark. It’s took two years. But it’s comin.— John Sissons

John Sissons is working hard to put the events of the past behind him, events that landed him in prison for a seven-year stretch. (Abide With Me) Out for two years, he’s been working at a market stall several days a week selling produce.

When that job dries up, John signs on with a job placement agency that gets him in working at a door factory. It’s dreary, repetitive, soul-crushing work, but twenty-five years old and knowing it’s time to get on with being a man, John sucks it up and sticks things out.

Slowly, things seem to be taking a turn for the better. John settles into the pattern of the work, the money’s coming in, and he even starts dating a young woman who works in the factory office. And

The Little Wine Guide by Ariel Heart

As a constantly evolving wine aficionado, I’m pleased to be a stop on Ariel Heart’s Pump Up Your Book blog tour in support of her new book, The Little Wine Guide. What follows is some information about the book and how Ariel came to write it, as well as your chance to enter to win a wine basket. — EAW

The Little Wine Guide by Ariel HeartThe Little Wine Guide Book Blast

“Don’t know much about wine? From Cabernet to Chardonnay, from buying wine to enjoying it; this jam-packed little book removes the mystery and makes learning about wine fun. The Little Wine Guide is presented in a conversational tone and helps you discover what interests you in the world of wine as you embrace your personal wine style.

Ms. Heart is a wine enthusiast on her personal wine journey who found most books on wine either too textbook, too long, or packed with information she didn’t need or want

The Office of Lost and Found by Vincent Holland-Keen

The Office of Lost and Found by Vincent Holland-Keen“My name is Thomas Locke. I am a private detective and what I’m about to say might sound strange, but it is absolutely true.”

Vincent Holland-Keen’s (Billy’s Monsters) debut novel The Office of Lost and Found is fueled by a cast of wonderfully quirky and endearing characters, and unfolds as several parallel, if time-bending, plots.

Thomas Locke is not just a detective, he’s a detective capable of finding anything, anywhere, no matter how long lost or how well hidden. He is the “found” half of The Office of Lost and Found.

Locke’s partner, Lafarge, brings new meaning to the term shadowy, literally appearing only as a tall, dark figure cloaked deep in shadows. He is the “lost” half of The Office of Lost and Found, and you better be sure you really want something lost before seeking his help, because things Lafarge loses stay lost.

Down the Darkest Street by Alex Segura

This was old Miami, classic, historic, with a coat of paint over something darker and more dangerous.

It’s been a year since we last saw Pete Fernandez in Silent City. And while he made it out of the events of that book alive, he may wish he hadn’t.

Fernandez has lost his job as a journalist, his marriage has fallen apart, his best friend was killed, and he’s learned those closest to you are the ones whose betrayal hurts the most—and are the ones that you never see coming.

And in case you think life is taking a turn for the better for Fernandez, Down the Darkest Street opens with Fernandez in an alley getting his ass kicked as a result of his drunken antics in the bar he’s been making home for the past year.

Not a complete lost cause, Fernandez decides to try and get things back on track by

Hey, Kids, Collect them All: The Awful Truth About Completism by Gavin Scott

It’s a pleasure to welcome Gavin Scott to the site today. Gavin has extensive experience in radio, film and television, having spent twenty years working as a reporter for the BBC and ITN, as well as in Hollywood as a screenwriter on projects with such film royalty as Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Gavin’s new novel, The Age of Treachery, first in a new series set in post WWII England and featuring ex-Special Operations Executive agent Duncan Forrester, is out now from Titan Books.

Hey, Kids, Collect them All: The Awful Truth About Completism

I suspect the syndrome began when I read the backs of serial packets in the 1950s and was urged by the manufacturers of Shredded Wheat and Rice Crispies to make sure that I had the complete set of the plastic Space Men/Pirates/Guardsmen/Divers/Miniature Nuclear Submarines that they were offering. Sadly, I was rarely able to eat enough Rice Crispies or Shredded Wheat to succeed: but

The Long Goodbye by Ian Ayris

It is an extreme pleasure to welcome Ian Ayris to the site today. I don’t know what Ian’s middle name actually is, but I secretly think it’s Midas, because everything he writes is pure gold as far as I’m concerned. His debut novel, Abide With Me, completely blew my doors off and was one of my Top 10 Reads of 2012. He followed that up with the complex and powerful novella One Day in the Life of Jason Dean, a story built around a hit man whose enthusiasm for the job is fading fast—like fading by the hour fast. Today, Ian’s here to talk about his newest novel, April Skies (out tomorrow from Caffeine Nights Publishing), an unexpected sequel to Abide With Me. Why unexpected? Well, Ian previously explained how difficult it was to write Abide With Me, so I’ll let him explain why writing the follow-up was unexpected, and

Catching Up With Alex Segura

Alex Segura is a busy man. In addition to his longtime, ongoing work with Archie Comics, he’s already had a novella (Bad Beat, co-written with Rob Hart) and a full-length novel (Silent City) released in 2016, with a second full-length novel (Down the Darkest Street) ready to drop on April 12th. He and his wife also added a beautiful baby boy to the Segura family in February. Despite his hectic schedule, Alex was kind enough to make some time recently for an interview, during which we talked comics, crossovers, his approach to writing, how location shapes and informs a story, and what he has planned for the future.

You’ve always kept busy as a writer, both through your work in comics and novels, as well as your background in journalism, but 2016 is posed to be a particularly bountiful year for you. It kicked off in January with the digital

The Shadow Broker by Trace Conger

I’m sort of like Death’s GPS. — Finn Harding

Finn “Mr. Finn” Harding has a unique talent for finding people, even those who desperately don’t want to be found. Unfortunately for the people he locates, once he finds them they’re usually never seen again—hence, Death’s GPS.

Once a legit, licensed private investigator, Finn strayed a little too far over the line into murky ethical waters during an assignment for a client and had his license revoked by the state of Ohio. Now, he’s been reduced to working for people who not only don’t care he doesn’t have a license, they kinda prefer it given they work outside the law themselves.

When Bishop, the owner of an underground website called Dark Brokerage that traffics in stolen sensitive and financial information, becomes the target of a blackmailer who hacked the site, Finn is hired to locate the source blackmail. Easy enough, it’s Finn’s speciality after all.

Except, once Finn

Surveillance by Reece Hirsch

“How are we going to run from them? How do you run from an agency that’s in the business of surveillance?” — Ian Ayres

There’s a saying that no good deed goes unpunished, and surely something similar to that has to be top of mind when Ian Ayres walks into the San Francisco law firm of Chris Bruen. A so-called “ethical hacker,” someone who hacks into companies at their request to test their cybersecurity and show them where their weaknesses are, Ayres found far more than he bargained for on his last job.

While conducting what he thought was a routine security probe, he came across information that indicates the existence of a highly classified, top-secret government organization, one which has apparently developed a program called Skeleton Key that can break any form of encryption. Unclear whether the program is on the company’s servers intentionally or if they’re being hacked/surveilled, Ayres brings his discovery to their attention. And that’s when all

Crosswise by S.W. Lauden

“Do your job, Mr. Ruzzo. Everything else will become clear in time.” — Mr. Adamoli

Tommy Ruzzo was once a promising NYPD officer. That was before his access to the precinct evidence locker, and the cocaine in it, sent his life on an unexpected detour. Though Internal Affairs was never able to prove Ruzzo took the coke, the cloud of suspicion he was placed under killed his career.

With no options on the table locally, Ruzzo tags along with his girlfriend, Shayna Billups, when she moves back to her hometown of Seatown, Florida. Given that Shayna, and her coke habit, was the reason Ruzzo was dipping into the evidence locker to being with, it’s a particularly low blow when she leaves him for her ex-husband as soon as the drugs and drug money run out.

Stuck in Florida with no chance at resuming a legitimate law enforcement career, Ruzzo is forced to settle for work as a rent-a-cop at

Six Things I Learned While Writing Surveillance by Reece Hirsch

I’m pleased to welcome Reece Hirsch to the site today. Hirsch’s latest thriller, Surveillance, third in the Chris Bruen series, drops today from Thomas & Mercer, and the plot couldn’t be more timely. Bruen, an attorney specializing in computer-crimes, and his partner, Zoey Doucet, a hacktivist, get drawn into a life or death scenario involving a top-secret government agency that has developed a program that can break any form of encryption. Today Hirsch is here to talk about quantum computing, domestic surveillance and what it’s like to write thrillers that may put you on the radar of exactly the type of people and agencies you’re writing about.

Six Things I Learned While Writing Surveillance

Like a lot of writers, I tend to think about my life not so much in years but in books. Whatever book I happen to be writing at the time casts its shadow over everything else that I happen